Met Office Issues Amber Weather Warning – Snow

Issued at:  09:57 on Wednesday 22 February 2017

Valid from:  02:00 on Thursday 23 February 2017

Valid to:  18:00 on Thursday 23 February 2017

Heavy snow is expected on Thursday. Accumulations of 10 to 15 cm are likely quite widely with 20 to 30 cm falling on hills above 300 metres. This will lead to disruption to transport and perhaps power supplies.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment

As storm Doris moves eastwards across central parts of the UK on Thursday a spell of heavy snow is expected on its northern flank. There is some uncertainty over the track of Doris and therefore over the extent of snowfall, but confidence is now higher for disruptive snow to affect the amber area.

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Met Office Issues Yellow Weather Warning – Rain

Issued at:  10:35 on Wednesday 22 February 2017

Valid from:  21:00 on Wednesday 22 February 2017

Valid to:  14:00 on Thursday 23 February 2017

A spell of heavy rain will affect Northern Ireland, southern Scotland and parts of northern England during Wednesday night and Thursday morning, falling as snow over some of the higher ground.

This has the potential to lead to some travel disruption and localised flooding.

The warning has been updated to extend the area into parts of southern Scotland and northern England.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment

Rainfall totals of 20-40 mm are expected across the area.

Met Office Issues Yellow Weather Warning – Wind

Issued at: 10:09 on Wednesday 22 February 2017

Valid from: 05:00 on Thursday 23 February 2017

Valid to: 20:00 on Thursday 23 February 2017

Some very strong winds are expected during Thursday in association with Storm Doris.

Gusts of 50-60 mph are expected widely across the warning area, with the risk of 70 mph on coasts and hills. A small swathe of even stronger winds is likely to develop – most likely across parts of northern England, Wales, the Midlands and later East Anglia. Here a short period of gusts of 70 to 80 mph is likely – please refer to the separate Amber warning.

Travel services could be affected including some restrictions on bridges and disruption to ferries. Some damage to trees and buildings is also possible.

This is an update to the warning issued on Tuesday to extend the area at risk.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment

A rapidly deepening area of low pressure, named Storm Doris, is expected to move quickly east across the UK during Thursday with strong winds on its southern and western flanks. Whilst there is confidence in the very windy spell, there is still some uncertainty about the track of Doris, and therefore the extent of the strongest winds.

Met Office Issues Yellow Weather Warning – Snow

Issued at: 09:27 on Wednesday 22 February 2017

Valid from: 02:00 on Thursday 23 February 2017

Valid to: 18:00 on Thursday 23 February 2017

Snow is expected over the high ground of northern England and Scotland on Thursday and may fall to low levels for a time in Scotland. Snow accumulations of 3 to 6 cm are likely above 200 metres with 10 cm or more above 300 metres. At low levels, including the Central Belt, 1 to 3 cm is possible in places. Expect some disruption to transport networks and possibly power supplies.

Associated heavy rain at low levels will be an additional hazard.

The warning has been updated to slightly shrink the yellow area and also to change the position in the risk matrix.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment

A developing area of low pressure, named Storm Doris, is expected to move east across the UK during Thursday.

Rain or sleet will occur at low levels at first, but some snow is also likely, perhaps more so as the system clears to the east. However, over the high ground and particularly the Southern Uplands, a spell of heavy snow looks likely.

In addition heavy rain may lead to some localised flooding at lower levels.

Met Office Issues Yellow Weather Warning – Snow

Issued at: 13:28 on Tuesday 10 January 2017

Valid from: 00:05 on Friday 13 January 2017

Valid to: 23:55 on Friday 13 January 2017

Further showers of snow, sleet and hail will continue across parts of the UK. 2 to 4 cm of snow may affect some lowland areas, while high ground may see locally 5 to 10 cm. Disruption to transport networks seems likely either due to snow or ice.

Additionally, strong winds and large waves will affect some eastern coastal areas.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment

A cold northerly airstream will keep the risk of wintry weather going through Friday. Some inland areas, sheltered from the northerly wind, seem likely to escape most of the showers.

Met Office Issues Yellow Weather Warning – Wind

Issued at: 09:53 on Tuesday 10 January 2017

Valid from: 01:00 on Wednesday 11 January 2017

Valid to: 11:00 on Wednesday 11 January 2017

A spell of very windy weather is expected during Wednesday, with the west to northwesterly wind likely to gust 60 mph in places, locally 75 mph over high ground.

Some disruption to road travel is likely, including restrictions on bridges.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment: 

The strongest winds will affect some of the higher level roads, for instance those over the Pennines and the Southern Uplands.

However, the northwesterly winds will also be very strong and gusty at lower levels too, including in areas to the east of high ground.

Met Office Issues Yellow Weather Warning – Wind

Issued at: 09:32 on Tuesday 20 December 2016

Valid from: 09:00 on Friday 23 December 2016

Valid to: 09:00 on Saturday 24 December 2016

A spell of very strong south to southwesterly winds is expected to develop on Friday. Gusts of 60 to 70 mph are likely quite widely, with westerly winds gusting to 80 – 90 mph likely across parts of western and northern Scotland later on Friday and overnight into Saturday. Winds will then moderate on Saturday morning.

Be aware of the potential for some structural damage – this more likely across the northwest of the warning area – as well as disruption to power supplies and travel, with restrictions on bridges and disruption to ferries.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment

A deep depression, now named Barbara, will move northeastwards across the Atlantic, passing close to the northwest of Scotland later Friday and overnight into Saturday. South to southwesterly winds will increase earliest across the west of the warning area early on Friday, before the strongest winds develop across western then northern Scotland later on Friday and overnight into Saturday. The last place to see winds easing is likely to be Shetland on Saturday morning.

Met Office Issues Yellow Weather Warning – Snow

Issued at: 09:46 on Tuesday 8 November 2016

Valid from: 15:00 on Tuesday 8 November 2016

Valid to: 10:00 on Wednesday 9 November 2016

Rain will turn to snow in places later on Tuesday and into Wednesday morning. This could bring accumulations of 4 to 8 cm across some hilly areas of northern England and Scotland, largely above 200-300 m, with as much as 15 cm possible above 300-400 m.

Overnight Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning, as snow peters out over Scotland, Pennine areas are expected to receive a covering of snow, largely on vegetated surfaces above 200-300 m. However, there is also the potential for 5-10 cm of snow to settle to low levels over parts of Yorkshire and down into the northeast Midlands, though with a good deal of uncertainty about this.

Please be aware of the potential for difficult driving conditions in some areas.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment

A band of rain spreading slowly in will turn to snow as it encounters cold air. Whilst this will be mainly on high ground, and heavier bursts could easily bring snow down to low levels. Overnight into Wednesday morning, there are concerns that heavier bursts could bring snow more widely down to low levels over parts of the Midlands and northern England, though at this stage there is still low confidence.

 

Met Office Issues Yellow Weather Warning – Rain

Issued at: 12:35 on Thursday 24 December 2015

Valid from: 15:00 on Friday 25 December 2015

Valid to: 23:45 on Saturday 26 December 2015

Outbreaks of rain will gradually spread north across Wales and northern England through the course of Christmas Day. The rain will be heavy at times, particularly over high ground and will persist through much of Boxing Day. 

Be aware of the potential for flooding and some disruption to transport.

This is an update to the warning issued on Wednesday morning to include latest estimates of rainfall amounts. Over southern Scotland the likelihood of medium impacts remains very low.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment: 

Rain, persistent and heavy at times, is expected to spread north across the UK on Christmas Day and Boxing Day. During Boxing Day the frontal system, bringing the heaviest and most prolonged spells of rain, is expected to become slow moving across the warning area. There remains uncertainty over where the heaviest rainfall will occur in the warning area, but around 60 to 80 mm is likely to fall quite widely over high ground, with 120 mm possible over the most exposed sites. Despite continuing uncertainties in frontal positioning and therefore rainfall amounts, evidence suggests rainfall accumulations will be sufficiently high to cause some medium levels of disruption. Given sensitivities with saturated ground over Cumbria, the likelihood of medium impacts is higher here and as a result an amber warning has been issued for parts of Cumbria. See the amber warning for further details.

This warning will be reviewed this (Thursday) afternoon and further updates are likely in the coming days