Met Office Issues Yellow Weather Warning – Wind

Issued at: 09:32 on Tuesday 20 December 2016

Valid from: 09:00 on Friday 23 December 2016

Valid to: 09:00 on Saturday 24 December 2016

A spell of very strong south to southwesterly winds is expected to develop on Friday. Gusts of 60 to 70 mph are likely quite widely, with westerly winds gusting to 80 – 90 mph likely across parts of western and northern Scotland later on Friday and overnight into Saturday. Winds will then moderate on Saturday morning.

Be aware of the potential for some structural damage – this more likely across the northwest of the warning area – as well as disruption to power supplies and travel, with restrictions on bridges and disruption to ferries.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment

A deep depression, now named Barbara, will move northeastwards across the Atlantic, passing close to the northwest of Scotland later Friday and overnight into Saturday. South to southwesterly winds will increase earliest across the west of the warning area early on Friday, before the strongest winds develop across western then northern Scotland later on Friday and overnight into Saturday. The last place to see winds easing is likely to be Shetland on Saturday morning.

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Met Office Issues Yellow Weather Warning – Snow

Issued at: 09:46 on Tuesday 8 November 2016

Valid from: 15:00 on Tuesday 8 November 2016

Valid to: 10:00 on Wednesday 9 November 2016

Rain will turn to snow in places later on Tuesday and into Wednesday morning. This could bring accumulations of 4 to 8 cm across some hilly areas of northern England and Scotland, largely above 200-300 m, with as much as 15 cm possible above 300-400 m.

Overnight Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning, as snow peters out over Scotland, Pennine areas are expected to receive a covering of snow, largely on vegetated surfaces above 200-300 m. However, there is also the potential for 5-10 cm of snow to settle to low levels over parts of Yorkshire and down into the northeast Midlands, though with a good deal of uncertainty about this.

Please be aware of the potential for difficult driving conditions in some areas.

Chief Forecaster’s Assessment

A band of rain spreading slowly in will turn to snow as it encounters cold air. Whilst this will be mainly on high ground, and heavier bursts could easily bring snow down to low levels. Overnight into Wednesday morning, there are concerns that heavier bursts could bring snow more widely down to low levels over parts of the Midlands and northern England, though at this stage there is still low confidence.